TO ALL My Family Who Served our Country with Honor in Any Branch of the Service ~ THANK –YOU


I want to honor all my family who are now serving or ever did serve in any branch of our military. I am grateful for all you gave to allow our way of life to be based on Freedom and Peace. My family is large and has a rich military history, as I started to gather up the names of all my family who served in the military I soon realized it was a much bigger project than I could do justice to. I also was afraid that even though I would not mean to, I most likely would leave someone name off the list. So instead of listing every military family member names I will proudly say that our family has many who have served in all branches of the Military, and in all the conflicts in America’s history from the Revolution War to some serving active duty now.

Our family’s military history has not been with just American history, the more I have learned about my family’s military experiences the more amazed I became. I am proud to say there has been many in my family who played key roles in many major world conflict throughout much of our recorded history.

There is the two Tanner brothers (later change the family surname to Danner) Michael Danner (1696 – 1782) (my paternal 6th great-grandfather) and Hans Jacob Danner (1698 – 1771) who were the sole survivors of their entire family. There had been many generations who were military soldiers who fought in the Switzerland and Germany area during a period in history we now call the “Christian Crusades”.There were many Kingdoms that were battling for more power and land to increase their wealth.

There is King Harald III of Norway Sigurdsson (1015- 1066) my paternal 27th great-grandfather. Harald was the last great Viking king of Norway and his invasion of England and death at the Battle of Stamford Bridge in 1066 proved a true turning point in history. It marked the end of the Viking age and beginning of the High Middle Ages.

There is Ithon ap Cymryw, King In Briton “ap Camber” Ap Perdur (1050 BC -) my paternal 95th great-grandfather. Here is what is said of him from the Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia; “Camber (Cymryw) Dux Cambria & Cornwall Kamber was a legendary king of Kambria as accounted by Geoffrey of Monmouth. He was the son of Brutus and a descendent of Aeneas of Troy. Upon his father’s death, he was given the region called Kambria after himself. This area corresponds roughly to present-day Wales. He aided his brother, Locrinus in the defeat of Humber, King of the Huns, which was an act of revenge for Humber’s murder of Albanactus, their younger brother.”

There is Dardanus Darda King of Dardania TROY, Birth 1470BC in BC in Samothrace, Thrace, near Marmara Sea, Turkey, and Death 1414 in BC in Rameses, Goshen, Egypt; he is my paternal 105th great-grandfather. Here is what I was able to learn about Dardanus; “One of the sons of Zerah (the scarlet thread) was Dara or Darda or Dardanus as called by the first century historian Josephus, or Darius as referred to in various Trojan genealogies. Darda is accredited as the founder of the city of Troy. Darda’s descendants never entered the Promised Land or took part in the Exodus of the Israelites. Apparently they left Egypt within those 400 years before there arose up a new king over Egypt. He was involves in the “Trojan wars”.

Then there is King David Israel, Birth 1063 in Bethlehem, Judah, Israel and Death 1015 in Yerushalayim, Israel/Jerusalem, Judah, Israel; he is my paternal 108th great-grandfather. I really don’t need to go into much detail as to what a Military warrior King David was.

I am proud and honored to be part of this family with so many Military warriors. Thanks for all who served with honor. An extra depth of gratitude to the ones who “gave their all” in the quest for peace and freedom.

While this is still very much a work in progress, I would like to end with sharing the “Military” page I am creating to honor my Father, Donald Barrett Danner who served our country with honor in the US Marine Corps, and is still serving in his local area with their Veterans events and in his community to do what he can at 84 to keep America strong and the land of the Brave.

My Father ~ Donald Barrett Danner ~ Staff Sergeant US Marine Corps ~
http://trees.ancestry.com/view/Military.aspx?tid=46411409&pid=6533441987&vid=69b34af4-252a-4687-8578-b55007605f0c

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Difference between Memorial Day and Veterans Day


I come from a family with a rich Military legacy. However,I always thought that Memorial Day was to honor ALL of our family who had died. I thought it was on Veterans Day that we honored and remembered all those who served in the Military, living and dead. So I did what I seemed to do now when I have a question… I went online and “Goggled” it so I could learn what the answers are. Here is what I found online to answer my question.
There is a distinct difference between Memorial Day and Veterans Day. This is the difference between the two days according to the VA website.
“Many people confuse Memorial Day and Veterans Day. Memorial Day is a day for remembering and honoring military personnel who died in the service of their country, particularly those who died in battle or as a result of wounds sustained in battle.”
While those who died are also remembered, Veterans Day is the day set aside to thank and honor all those who served honorably in the military – in wartime or peacetime. In fact, Veterans Day is largely intended to thank LIVING veterans for their service, to acknowledge that their contributions to our national security are appreciated, and to underscore the fact that all those who served, not only those who died, have sacrificed and done their duty.
To ensure the sacrifices of America’s fallen are never forgotten, in December 2000, the U.S. Congress passed and the president signed into law “The National Moment of Remembrance Act,”. The National Moment of Remembrance encourages all Americans to pause wherever they are at 3 p.m. local time on Memorial Day for a minute of silence to remember and honor those who have died in service to the nation. As Moment of Remembrance founder Carmella LaSpada stated: “It’s a way we can all help put the memorial back in Memorial Day.”

So, as I made the rounds through ten different cemeteries this year placing flowers on all my family members graves, I asked myself, why do we put flowers on all our family members’ graves during Memorial Day, and not just our Military family members? After all, unless our family members died in service to our country, Memorial Day is not about them. While it is always appropriate to honor our loved ones, and remember them and even visit their final resting places, this is not the point of Memorial Day.
SO, after some careful thought here is the reason why I feel that my family places flowers on ALL our family graves. We are carrying on the “Traditions of Our Fathers”. It’s not to take away from honoring our Military ancestors and the sacrifices they made in serving our country, but rather to extend our honoring to all our family members, whether they served in the military or civilian life, the family legacy we enjoy now is because of each ancestors mark in life for the time period they lived.
I say “Thank-You” to all my ancestors for allowing things to unfold the way they did in their lives that allows me to enjoy the many blessing I have in my life, and that gives me a wonderful family legacy to pass on to my children and grandchildren.
But, to stay in line with the “Traditional Meaning of Memorial Day”, I want to focus the rest of my May 2014 blogs on my Military ancestors and tell some of their stories. I hope some of the rest of you will also share some of your family Military ancestor stories too.

I hope everyone has a safe and enjoyable Memorial Weekend 2014.

Once a Marine .... Always a Marine

Once a Marine …. Always a Marine


A Marine Paratrooper

A Marine Paratrooper


Even going on 84 years old, My Father looks handsome in his Marine Dress Uniform.

Even going on 84 years old, My Father looks handsome in his Marine Dress Uniform.

We were proud parents as we attended Donald's Boot Camp Graduation Aug 2007

We were proud parents as we attended Donald’s Boot Camp Graduation Aug 2007

While station in Japan, our son Donald received an award for when he came back to his ship    on Friday night, there was a fire on the ship, and his quick actions was able to get the fire put out quickly and prevent major damage. Yes, we are proud Navy Parents.

While station in Japan, our son Donald received an award for when he came back to his ship on Friday night, there was a fire on the ship, and his quick actions was able to get the fire put out quickly and prevent major damage. Yes, we are proud Navy Parents.

My daughter, Kristine, did not take many photo of her in her Air Force uniform, but I want to make she she know we are proud parents of her as well for the years she served Active Duty Air Force.

My daughter, Kristine, did not take many photo of her in her Air Force uniform, but I want to make sure she know we are proud parents of her as well for the years she served Active Duty Air Force.

What Famous Family Members Does Your Family Have


Meriwether Lewis (1774 – 1809) is my 9th great grand-uncle.

Zachary Lewis (1702 – 1765) father of Meriwether Lewis

Mary Lewis (1726 – 1755) daughter of Zachary Lewis

John “Black John” Nickell (1738 – 1807) son of Mary Lewis

Mary Polly Nickel (1774 – 1847) daughter of John “Black John” Nickell

Margaret “Peggy” Cravens (1792 – 1831) daughter of Mary Polly Nickel

Mary Jane Hite (1816 – 1903) daughter of Margaret “Peggy” Cravens

Bernard S. Adam (1845 – ) son of Mary Jane Hite

Eliza Ann Adams (1821 – 1864) daughter of Bernard S. Adam

John Barrett (twin) (1837 – 1894) son of Eliza Ann Adams

Edward Barrett (1862 – 1954) son of John Barrett (twin)

Ellen Barrett (1905 – 1999) daughter of Edward Barrett

Donald Barrett Danner son of Ellen Barrett

Karen Louise Danner Loveless, I am the daughter of Donald Barrett Danner

2nd Governor of Louisiana Territory In office March 3, 1807 – October 11, 1809 Appointed by	Thomas Jefferson Preceded by	James Wilkinson Succeeded by	Benjamin Howard Personal details Born	August 18, 1774 Ivy, Colony of Virginia Died	October 11, 1809 (aged 35) Hohenwald, Tennessee, U.S. Spouse(s)	none Alma mater	Liberty Hall (Washington and Lee University), 1793 Occupation	Explorer, soldier, politician

2nd Governor of Louisiana Territory
In office
March 3, 1807 – October 11, 1809
Appointed by Thomas Jefferson
Preceded by James Wilkinson
Succeeded by Benjamin Howard
Personal details
Born August 18, 1774
Ivy, Colony of Virginia
Died October 11, 1809 (aged 35)
Hohenwald, Tennessee, U.S.
Spouse(s) none
Alma mater Liberty Hall (Washington and Lee University), 1793
Occupation Explorer, soldier, politician

The Lewis and Clark Expedition, also known as the Corps of Discovery Expedition, was the first American expedition to cross what is now the western portion of the United States, departing in May, 1804 from St. Louis on the Mississippi River, making their way westward through the continental divide to the Pacific coast.
The expedition was commissioned by President Thomas Jefferson shortly after the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, consisting of a select group of U.S. Army volunteers under the command of Captain Meriwether Lewis and his close friend Second Lieutenant William Clark. Their perilous journey lasted from May 1804 to September 1806. The primary objective was to explore and map the newly acquired territory, find a practical route across the Western half of the continent, and establish an American presence in this territory before Britain and other European powers tried to claim it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meriwether_Lewis

I know as a child I remember my grandmother telling us we was related to Meriwether Lewis, but I was never sure how we tried into him, so when I found out how, it was if I discovered a long-lost family member. I know there are other famous family members on all the family lines, that as we discover them in our family it gives us a sense of pride to know we are related to those who have made a mark in history.

So what famous family members do you have in your family?

My Mother ~ Della Rae Smith Danner ~ A Life of Unconditional Love and Service


My Mother

My mother’s life began in her parents’ home on a cold winter night on January 23, 1932. Her parents, Hyrum Eldoras and Lema Lucille Critchfield Smith gave her the name of Della Rae Smith. She spent her childhood and youth living in a small Southern Idaho town called Albion. She had an older brother Merl an older sister Edna and a younger brother Jerry. Her father was a carpenter, yet during the ‘Depression Years’, he did whatever jobs he could find. Her mother was a natural cook that could make everything she cooked taste like a bit of Heaven.

The Smith Family

The Smith Family

Mom's Band Days

Mom the Cheerleader

My mom was your average teenage girl of the 1940’s. She played the trumpet in her school band, was a cheerleader and was a natural at playing sports. She loved to be involved in anything and everything that was fun. Mom had a smile and laugh that made anyone around her instantly fall in love with her. I was told that my father Donald Barrett Danner, told my mother even before they had started kindergarten he was going to marry her, a promise he kept 15 years later on December 2, 1950. By the end of 1951 my father’s Marine Corp career had them living in Barstow, California and the proud parents of my oldest brother Donald Kay. Over the next 15 years my parents welcomed to their family my other brother Fred, and my sisters Joann, Theresa, and my baby sister Kathy. I came into the family between my sisters Theresa and Kathy.

Mr & Mrs. Donald B Danner

In 1967 my father took a career opportunity that moved our family from Southern California to the Island of Okinawa which is south of the mainland of Japan. We would spend the next six and half years living there. My father’s job had him often traveling back and forth between Okinawa and Vietnam leaving my mother to take on most of the raising of their six children and working her full time job at the base credit union. During this time period my three oldest siblings graduated from high school, and all of us children were involved in many different areas that interested us, from Sports, to being in the school plays, in choirs, and learning to play different musical instruments. My mother supported each one of us and was our # 1 cheerleader. Her father passed away in 1970 and she went home for several months to help her mother and siblings to get his affairs in order. Whatever life sent our family’s way, my mother would tackle it, giving it her all and doing her best at each task she needed to deal with.
My parents always had an “Open Door” policy in our home. There were days, after mom had already put in a full 8 hour shift at her job, she would come home to get a call from my dad saying another group of young Marines or Sailors had come in and was on their layover going to the Vietnam war. Then he wanted to know if he could bring some of those who had nowhere else to hang out that night to our home for dinner. We were not rich in the sense of “Money” but when it came to love, and showing compassion for our fellowman my mother made sure our home was overflowing with this important kind of wealth. We always knew that anyone who needed a place to rest or just a place and family to enjoy that our mother would always have a place for them to come. This also included any stray dog or cat that my sister Theresa was famous for somehow finding and bringing home. Life was never dull at our childhood home.

Danner Family

Mom had no problem getting right in the middle of whatever silly, crazy things us kids or our dad would want to do. I remember one night when we had some young Marine’s over and my older brother, Don’s band was practicing for one of their upcoming events, they talked mom into being the lead singer for the song “Gloria”. She was rocking out and hamming it up as she sang to make us all laugh. Then to our surprise we looked to see standing at the front door, which was always open with just the screen door to keep the bugs out, some men from the church who had come to talk with my father. We all laughed so hard over how funny the expression on the men’s faces were over seeing our normally shy mother being so silly and outgoing.
“A mother’s love for her child is like nothing else in the world. It knows no law, no pity. She dares all things and crushes down remorselessly all that stands in her child’s path.”
I don’t know who said this, but it is so true when it comes to my mother. She was a conservative, quiet lady in public. She was 5 feet tall and most of her life she never weighed much over 100 pounds. She was loyal, kind, hardworking, and a talented lady. She was someone you wanted on your side, but Lord help the person who was foolish enough to mess with one of her family members. When mom released her “Mama Bear” hold on, you were in for a wild ride, and trust me Mom always achieved whatever her goal was when she was in the “Mama Bear”mode.
I was a sickly child who was born with no immune system, so I spent pretty much the first years of my life in the hospital. This had to have been so difficult for mom, to have four older children needing her attention at home and a baby girl who cried anytime she had to leave to go home. When I could manage to break out of my “Oxygen Tent” I would tackle her as she was walking down the hallway trying to leave to go home to her other children. I remember her sitting by my hospital bed reading to me for hours on end. She would hold my hand threw the plastic cover area that allowed her to hold my hand and sing me songs until I fell asleep. I still have and cherish the plastic toy lamb that she brought to me when I was in the hospital when I was three years old.

Moving to Okinawa 1967

Moving to Okinawa 1967

Mom would make holidays so special and something I looked forward to. It was not the big grand over the top things, it was the simple things that made her children know she loved us. An example was she would bake our birthday cakes with a quarter that was wrapped up in foil, and we each were excited as we received our piece of birthday cake. We ate our cake very careful to make sure we did not eat the quarter by mistake, and could not wait to see who would end up with the treasure of the quarter. Back then a quarter was a lot of money to us kids.
I remember before I started kindergarten, and all my siblings were in school, Mom would give me some small chore to do in the morning and then before lunch she would pay me a nickel, and take me to the local store in Hinkley
that was similar to our present day 7-11 stores. I could buy me a box of Cracker-Jacks and I would take it home and put it on the table. I would eat my lunch, and then take my nap. After nap time I could watch my favorite TV game show “Let’s Make a Deal” and eat my Cracker Jacks. For me, life just could not have been happier than those pre-school days of me, my mom, and my Cracker Jack snacks.
Mom loved to do crafts and make things to make our home feel cozier. While living in Okinawa my mom took classed to learn to make Japanese dolls, one of which I proudly displayed in my home in our music room. Mom learned to do Japanese embroidering and made many beautiful pictures, which I believe each of her family members received one. I ended up with the photo of a tiger coming out of the forest that I love, every time I look at it I think back to those childhood days as I sat and watched mom working on her needle craft art work. I am a left hander, making it difficult for everyone to try to teach me any crafts. My mom was very patient as she would sit directly in front of me and teach me how to crochets. It took me forever to learn how to do it, but mom never gave up on me. I remember her and me working to crochet flower roses or carnations and put them in nice vase displays so we could sell them at our church auctions to help raise money for needy causes. There were all kinds of cute crochet patterns my mom taught me to make. I would make the items and sell them and use the funds I earned to buy items like china and silverware for my “Hope” chest, so when I got married I would be ready to be the kind of mother my mom was.
I remember after we moved from Okinawa to Virginia in 1973, I had one of my lungs collapse and had pneumonia. I was deathly ill for several months. Mom made me a cot bed right by her side of my parent’s bed. She would get up every hour to make sure I at least got one tablespoon of water drank every hour of the day. Whatever one of her children’s needs were, mom would move heaven and earth to make it happen.

Mom went with me when our first child, Kristine was bore, because my husband was in Tech School in Texas at the time with his Air Force job.

Mom went with me when our first child, Kristine was bore, because my husband was in Tech School in Texas at the time with his Air Force job.

Fall 1995, Pomona Hospital California.

Fall 1995, Pomona Hospital California.

Sometime in mom’s late 40’s or early 50’s she was diagnose with Rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren’s syndrome, and Lupus. In spite of the fact that we could tell she was in lots of pain all the time, mom would not complain or whine about her illnesses. She did what she could to control her illness but she did not let her illness control her. Mom stayed as active as she could and she loved to play her organ. Mom and dad moved back to their childhood town of Albion, Idaho when they retired. She loved it whenever anyone of her 19 grandchildren would come for a visit. She made sure to give them some money so they could ride their bikes to the local store and buy some ‘penny’ candy.
In the fall of 1995 my mother suffered a Brain Aneurysm while in California visiting her family and dealing with some legal matters with a case our family was involved in at that time. Luckily my aunt only lived a few blocks from the hospital and they were able to get her there fast. The doctor told my father that mom had died on the operating table a few times, but they had been able to bring her back. Despite the fact we were lucky she had survive this ordeal the family needed to prepare ourselves that mom would most likely be in a weaker state and might not be able to talk or know who we were. I lived in Texas at the time, my brother Fred was living in England, Kathy was in Idaho, Joann and Don lived in Utah, and Theresa lived in San Diego. We all went to Pomona California to spend some time with mom while she was in the hospital. We did not know it at that time, but it would be the last time our whole family would get to spend time together while all of us was still alive. Mom’s recovery at that hospital took many months. Yet the miracles we saw unfold during that time brought us closer together as a family.
While my mother was fighting for her life on the operating table in Southern California, her younger brother Jerry died in Idaho. When we found out about Jerry’s death we decided as a family that it was best not to tell mom because it would upset her too much, and in her weakened condition we did not want to chance losing mom too. Mom came out of her unconscious state a few days after her surgery. To all of our surprise mom was able to talk, and she knew who everyone was, except for me. For some reason even though she knew who her mother was, and even if both grandma and I were in the room at the same time, she still would say I was her mother too. It took mom some time before she was able to know who I was, but after what she been through, I felt God had been kind to our family to allow us to have mom with us still. Mom was not the same as before the Aneurysm, she was more childlike, and only talked about simple matters. A few days after moms operation, we were all sitting around her hospital room, and she started to tell us about what happened when she had died. She said in a matter of fact way, as if this was something that happens to everyone, Mom said, “Yeah, I died, and dad and Jerry (the brother who had just died) was there to meet me. They said they could not stay and that I had to go back to life, because I had some unfinished stuff to do with my family there. I said to dad I do not understand dad, why does Jerry get to stay, I want to stay too. Dad told me it’s not my turn and I needed to go back, but I would be with them soon enough.” We all looked at each other, and said “OK which one told mom about Jerry”. Before anyone of us could answer, mom said, “None of you, I just know because I got to say goodbye to him when I was with him and dad in Heaven.” I had heard of other “after death” experiences but had never know anyone personally until my mother. With me being the “Doubting Thomas” kind of person that would not normally have believed my mother’s “After Death” story, I became a firm believer that day of her “After Death” story.
We were blessed to have our mother for another three years. Many good things happened in those last three years. We all learned not to take life for granted, or our mom. As teenagers, we thought she was a mean, moody, controlling mother, as most teenagers feel about their parents during those years. As young adults with children of our own, we had learned how difficult being a parent really is. We stopped judging mom for every perceived fault she had, and started to see her for the strong, wise, woman she always was. Life had dealt her some difficult hands, and yet she could handle them far better than any of us. While mom was firm on her parenting skills, she always loved each of us unconditionally and she never gave up on us, when so many others had. When a stroke finally claimed mom’s life in 1998, she had lived her life better than most. It has been almost 16 years since moms death, yet her influence is felt daily by all of us who were blessed to know and love her. Each member in her family is stronger, and wiser, and able to love and give, because we have a mother that was not afraid to live life to the fullest, and give her all to those she loved.
To all the unselfish moms out there who traded eyeliner for dark circles, salon haircuts for ponytails, long baths for quick showers, late nights for early mornings, designer bags for diaper bags, and wouldn’t change a thing. Happy Mother’s Day!

4 Generations of Strong Ladies
To My Mother who is now in Heaven with my brother Fred, I say Thank you mom for everything.
I love you, I honor you, and I miss you!

Michael Danner Is My Paternal 6th great grandfather


Michael Danner
Is my Paternal 6th great grandfather
Birth 7 May 1696 in Grand Duchy Baden, Mannheim, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany
Death 29 May 1782 in Hanover, York, Pennsylvania, United States

Resources:
1. Family Data Collection – Births about Michael Tanner Danner
• Source Information: Edmund West, comp.. Family Data Collection – Births [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2001.
Name: Michael Tanner Danner
Father: Hans Danner
Birth Date: 1701
City: Wiesloch

2. U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 about Michael Danner
• Source Citation: Source number: 31.000; Source type: Electronic Database; Number of Pages: 1; Submitter Code: PJM.
• Source Information: Yates Publishing. U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2004.
• Name: Michael Danner
Gender: Male
• Birth Place: Ba
• Birth Year: 1696
• Spouse Name: Anna Bend
• Birth Place: Ba

3. Web: Pennsylvania, Find A Grave Index, 1682-2012 about Michael Danner
• Source Information: Ancestry.com. Web: Pennsylvania, Find A Grave Index, 1682-2012 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
• Original data: Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi: accessed 28 January 2013.
• Name: Michael Danner
Birth Date: 1696
• Age at Death: 85
• Death Date: 1781
• Burial Place: York County, Pennsylvania, USA
• URL: http://www.findagrave.com

4. U.S. and Canada, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s about Michael Danner
• Source Information: Ancestry.com. U.S. and Canada, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2010.
• Original data: Filby, P. William, ed. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s. Farmington Hills, MI, USA: Gale Research, 2012.
• Name: Michael Danner
Arrival Year: 1727
Arrival Place: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Source Publication Code: 7820
Primary Immigrant: Danner, Michael
Annotation: An index by Marvin V. Koger, Index to the Names of 30,000 Immigrants…Supplementing the Rupp, Ship Load Volume, 1935, 232p is inferior to Wecken’s index in the third edition (above). Page 449 contains “Names of the First Palatines in North Carolina, as
Source Bibliography: RUPP, ISRAEL DANIEL. A Collection of Upwards of Thirty Thousand Names of German, Swiss, Dutch, French and Other Immigrants in Pennsylvania from 1727 to 1776, with a Statement of the Names of Ships, Whence They Sailed, and the Date of Their Arrival at Philadelphia, Chronologically Arranged, Together with the Necessary Historical and Other Notes, also, an Appendix Containing Lists of More Than One Thousand German and French Names in New York prior to 1712. Leipzig [Germany]:
Page: 51

5. Pennsylvania, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1772-1890 about Michael Danner
• Source Information: Ancestry.com. Pennsylvania, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1772-1890 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 1999.
• Original data: Jackson, Ronald V., Accelerated Indexing Systems, comp Pennsylvania Census, 1772-1890. Compiled and digitized by Mr. Jackson and AIS from microfilmed schedules of the U.S. Federal Decennial Census, territorial/state censuses, and/or census substitutes.
• Name: Michael Danner
State: PA
County: Philadelphia County
Township: Philadelphia
Year: 1742
Database: PA Early Census Index

6. York County, Pennsylvania Wills, 1749-1819 about Michael Danner
• Source Information: Lineages, Inc., comp, York County, Pennsylvania Wills, 1749-1819 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2000.
• Original data: York County Wills. Originals housed at the York County Archives.
• Name: Michael Danner
Description: Executor
• Date: 2 Nov 1762
• Prove Date: 12 Nov 1762
• Remarks: Honsicker, Jacob. Nov. 2, 1762. Executors: Catharine Honsicker and Michael Danner. Manheim Township. Wife: Catharine Hunsicker.

7. York County, Pennsylvania Wills, 1749-1819 about Michael Danner
• Source Information: Lineages, Inc., comp, York County, Pennsylvania Wills, 1749-1819 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2000.
• Original data: York County Wills. Originals housed at the York County Archives.
• Name: Michael Danner
Description: Executor
• Date: 30 Jun 1755
• Prove Date: 22 Aug 1755
• Remarks: Welty, Peter. Jun. 30, 1755. Executors: Michael Danner and John Welty. Manheim Township. Wife: Catharine Welty. Children: John and Abraham.

8. Find A Grave Memorial# 18913365 – Danner/Tanner, Michael 1696-1781
• Birth: 1696
• Death: 1781
• Michael and family left Hanover, Germany in 1715 and first settled near Germantown.
Later, in 1727 he moved to the Pequea Settlement of Lancaster County according to article in “Brethren Roots and Branches”, Vol 3, Dec1981. Some confusion exists because the “Mennonite Encyclopedia” refers to Michael Danner as “an early member of the Mellinger Mennonite congregation of Lancaster County” and suggests he crossed the river ( Susquehanna) by 1719. In 1728, the Indians appealed to Governor Gordon to have certain settlers removed from the lands west of the Susquehanna River. Among them was Michael Danner. He was considered an intruder on lands which the Indians had not yet released to the white settlers. The authorities duly removed them. Refer to
“History of York County, PA” by Rupp, pg. 347.
In 1732, Samuel Blunston, land agent for the Penn’s, wrote to the Governor about some men arrested by associates of Col. Thomas Cresaps of Maryland and taken to Annapolis. Included was Michael Danner. Although Gov. Samuel Ogle of Maryland later argued that the German settlers west of the Susquehanna had not been granted patents, at least 50 of these families had agreed to claim land under Maryland jurisdiction by 1736. A letter signed by 50 Germans renouncing their Maryland affiliation dated August 11, 1736 infers this. (Michael Tanner et al). See Archives of Maryland 28:100-101. Until 1736, most of the Germans who crossed the Susquehanna River were only too willing to accept Maryland jurisdiction. In 1732, the tax collector reported at least 400 persons living west of the river who paid taxes to Lancaster County (History of Pa, W.H. Eagle, 1876, pg.1169).
On 17 Sep 1734, Michael Danner received from Samuel Blunston, land agent of the Penn’s in Columbia, PA, a license to settle 200 acres on the west side if the Susquehanna River about six miles southwest of John Hendricks ( Quaker of Wrightsville). This would be somewhere near Mt. Pisgah or Canadochly Church in what later became Lowe Windsor Twp.
In 1736, Michael Danner apparently was arrested a second time by Maryland authorities. Records of the Sheriff of Anna Arundel County of 4 Jan 1736 mention taking prisoner, Michael Tanner of Baltimore County, for having driven some fellows from his home in Pennsylvania.
In August 1739 he was one of the six Commissioners named to lay out a road from Wrightsville to the home of Adam Forney at Digges Choice and later Hanover. The road extended by way of Kitzmiller’s Mill to the Province line and was known as “Monocacy Road”. Some claim that originally the family was Mennonite, but Gleim thought not.
Michael Danner is listed as the first leader of the German Baptists (Dunkard’s) west of the Susquehanna. In 1770, Danner is listed as a member of the Conewago Congregation (Black Rock Church of the Brethren).
At one time, Michael Danner owned about 290 acres of land in the vicinity of Porter’s Siding in Heidelberg Twp. The Tax Lists of Hanover and Heidelberg Twp. for 1778-80 include Michael Danner. Heidelberg Twp. created in 1750 from northern portion of Manheim Twp.
“Was Michael Danner a Mennonite?” is a six page article in the Dec 1981 Brethren Roots and Branches, quarterly publication of the Brethren Genealogists of Southern PA, 2490 Middle St., York, PA 17404. Article suggests that he was a German Baptist with Mennonite neighbors. The article reports that he was an aggressive, enterprising German who was exceptional both in character and in his abilities. He spoke both English and German. The book, History and Families of the Black Rock Church of the Brethren, by Elmer Q. Gleim has numerous references to him and indicates he was of the Brethren faith.
An Act of August, 1749, in the Provincial Council of Philadelphia named six men “to view and lay off a new County (York). Danner was among them. In 1755 he was appointed as one of “His Majesty’s Justices of the Peace”, (History of York County, Prowell).
Application of Henry Danner filed in Orphans Court, York County during May 1782 for probate of his father’s estate lists
• His widow, Anna Catharina Marie Bend Danner
• His children:
• Jacob Danner 1727 – 1814 ( my 5th Great Grandfather)
• Catharine Danner 1728 – 1790
• Anna Danner 1730 – 1804
• Johann George Danner 1730 – 1765
• Michael Danner 1734 – 1782
• Philip Danner 1735 – 1829
• Elizabeth Danner 1736 – 1798
• Heinrich Danner 1742 – 1814
• Maria Danner 1744 – 1816
(Probate Book F-15).
In 1728 settled at Cabin Creek mouth on Susquehanna River he got into a dispute over land. When arrested by Maryland civil authorities placed in prison in Annapolis. After his release became permanent settler of York County ( PA Ger. Soc. Vol. 24 & 25, pg. 57) Tanner (Danner), with a number of Mennonites from Lancaster Co. settled in the rich farming lands of the Conewago Valley near “Digg’s Choice” on the banks of the Codorus,
Heidelberg Twp. in 1738. This colony of Mennonites was the nucleus of Bair’s Hanover Church. Names of other settlers here were: Hershey, Brubaker, Bair (Bare), Kauffman, Frantz, Shank, Garber, Bechtel, Bauman, Thoman, Rudisill).
Danner spoke both German and English. Appointed County Commissioner in 1749 to help lay out York County. Bair’s Hanover was first Mennonite congregation in York County to erect a church (3.5 east of Hanover on Hanover- Spring Grove Road). First structure was of logs (1746). Peter Blasser was first known ordained Mennonite minister in the Michael Danner settlement. He had arrived in 1739 and had been a Mennonite prisoner from Trachselwald in Berne. Later his children settled near Stony-Man near Blue Ridge, VA. Adam Forney had settled there earlier (1730).
Burial: York Road Cemetery, Hanover, York County, Pennsylvania, USA
Created by: Leanne Keefer Bechdel
Record added: Apr 13, 2007

9. Little Conewago Congregation – 1770 of the German Baptist Brethren Church
• Little Conewago Congregation – 1770 of the German Baptist Brethren Church in York County, PA
Memberships listed as: Henry Tanner (Donner) and wife; Michael Tanner and wife.
Found on the internet 9/22/2009:
Bair Mennonite Meetinghouse (Spring Grove, Pennsylvania, USA)
The Bair Mennonite Meetinghouse (Mennonite Church) is located three miles (six km) east of Hanover, York County, Pennsylvania. On 14 May 1775 Michael Danner, Sr., of Hanover, a York County Commissioner when the county was laid out, obtained from the Penn heirs with preachers John Shenk and Jacob Keagy, deacons John Welty and James Miller, 12 acres for a meetinghouse, schoolhouse, and burying ground. Possibly the Lutherans and Reformed had an interest in the schoolhouse. The first meetinghouse was used until 1860, and the second house until 1908, when the house used in the 1950s was erected. It was a part of the Hostetter-Hanover circuit of the Lancaster Mennonite Conference of which Richard Danner was bishop in the 1950s. The circuit membership was 122.
Bair Mennonite Meetinghouse (Spring Grove, Pennsylvania)
Address: 6925 York Road, Spring Grove, Pa.
N 39° 49.066 W 076° 56.538
18S E 333760 N 4409336
Quick Description: Bair’s Mennonite Meeting House is located in Heidelberg Township, York County, Pennsylvania.
Location: Pennsylvania, United States

10. License to Settle
• Danner … received a license, Sept. 17, 1734, to settle “200 acres of land on the west side of the Susquehanna River…about six miles southwesterly from John Hendricks”. The license was granted by Samuel Blunston who promised a regular land grant as soon as the Indians would release their claims on the lands. Lord Baltimore issued warrants against settlers in the disputed lands (southern York Co.). In May 1736, Thomas Cresap and 300 militiamen came to the Susquehanna River to survey the lands from the Susquehanna River to the Codorus Creek. Cresap waited for more militiamen from Maryland to take prisoner all who lived between Wright’s Ferry and the Codorus Creek because they refused to acknowledge themselves as tenants of Lord Baltimore. When the MD militiamen began to seize settler’s property/goods, Danner represented the citizens and succeeded in having the militiamen withdraw for two weeks. The (York Co.) settlers appealed for protection from Pennsylvania. Gov. Ogle of MD was angry and offered 100 pounds for the arrest of each person who signed the petition. There is some evidence that Danner was taken twice to Maryland for “trespassing” in York Co.
In 1736, Michael Danner appeared before a Maryland court to repurchase the properties.
According to the Conewago settlement and tombstone records, the family of Michael and Anna Danner were:
• Jacob (1727-1799) married Elizabeth Boechtel, daughter of Samuel Boechtel of Manheim Twp. Jacob became the presiding elder of the Codorus Cong. and later moved to MD where he helped establish the Lingamore (Locust Grove) church.
• Catharine ( 1728 – 1790) married George Wehrly
• Anna (Dec 6, 1730-Jan 10, 1804) married Stefan Petry (1729-1793) Stefan and Anna are buried in the Chestnue Grove Ch Cem.
• Michael Jr. (1734 -1782) married Susanna Kehr whose family was Mennonite.
• Philip (1735 – 1829) married Markret (Margaret) Millheim, daughter of George Millheim of Manheim Twp.
• Elizabeth (Nov. 13, 1736-April 21, 1798) married Christian Bear (June 10, 1733-April 17, 1795)
• Heinrich (Feb 12, 1742-Feb 5, 1814) married Elizabeth Kehr (Sept 28, 1744-June 17, 1828) Heinrich was a minister in the Little Conewago church.
• Maria (Dec 24, 1744-Feb 18, 1816) twice married (1) Heinrich Hohf (d. Aug 9, 1783) and to (2) Daniel Utz.
Source: “The History and Families of the Black Rock Church of the Brethren 1738-1988″, Anniversary Volume, Elmer Q. Gleim
Online source: http://www.vonbehren.net/gen_web/hodges/AT01/AT01_009.HTM
11. Discoveries in York, PA October, 2007
• I went to York County Heritage Museum on Oct 09, 2007. Have many photocopies of articles, letters and other documents relating to Michael and his descendants.
Michael assisted in laying out the County of York, PA.
Michael surveyed the Monocacy Road.
Michael was named “King’s Commissioner of Highways” and was a very prominent man of his time.
Michael assisted in the survey of the Mason-Dixon Line (this line eventually became the state boundary between Pennsylvania and Maryland)
Michael and his sons Jacob and Heinrich were granted 6 acres for their church and cemetery by the sons of William Penn.
Michael and his wife Anna Bend are buried in Bair’s Meeting House Cemetery located on Rt 166 about 2 miles east of Hanover. A stone was placed a great time later by the church, honoring Michael and his wife, Anna. (Note: the stone bears the name: Susanna instead of Anna. Susanna was Michael’s daughter-in-law – wife of Heinrich)
• Source: charlischisler originally shared this to Charlena Danner Pedigree

12. General Notes:
• Michael came from Germany via Rotterdam on the James Goodwell, David Crockett, ship’s master. The 200 passengers and 53 families were listed as Palatines. They arrived in Philadelphia on Sep 27, 1727. He was a Swiss Mennonite and a member of the Bair Mennonite Meeting house in Hanover, York Co, Pennsylvania. He received the title of “King’s Commissioner of Highways for Pennsylvania in 1734. About 1760 when his son, Jacob led a group of settlers from York Co, PA to Frederick Co, MD, Michael and sons Jacob and Henry ended up platting/surveying the Monocacy Road down the west side of the Monocacy River (with the Blue Ridge Mountains back of it.) It became a main route of settlement from Lancaster Co., PA, down the river, across the Blue Ridge at Frederick to the Potomac River (north of Harper’s Ferry), on to Virginia, Tennessee and the Carolinas. This was called the Monocacy Trail. He also surveyed the York Road which was a very important route that linked York, PA to the Port of Baltimore. In 1770, he was listed as a prominent member to the Conewago German Baptist Brethren Church. (CL-514, 526) There is some indication that Michael also had a daughter named Mary Danner, as a John Kehr leaves a will in 1794 in York Co, PA that refers to his wife Mary and his loving brother in law, Henry Danner. (CL-526) 4 Michael married Anna BEND about 1726 in , , , Germany.
• Sources
1 Kelly, Mary, Email dated 2000 forwarded by Nathan Danner from Mary Kelly at stock@netrax.net.
2 Danner, Nathan, Email dated 2000 from nathan_danner@STEV.net.
3 FamilyTreeMaker Database at http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/l/3/n/Laurie-L-Lendosky/COL6-0149.html.
4 Perry, Virginia, Email dated 2000 from vperry@midwest.net.

13. Bair’s Meeting House
• Bair’s Meeting House was a Mennonite meeting house located about 3 miles east of Hanover on the York Road. The land on which it was built was granted to Michael Danner, in trust for the Mennonite congregation, on August 8, 1774 by John and Thomas Penn, sons of William Penn.
Michael Danner was a prominent man of his day and, in 1749, was one of the commissioners appointed to lay off York County. The grant to Michael Danner was “in trust to and for the only proper use of the Mennonites, their heirs and successors forever”. For many years, the Mennonite services had been held in the homes of members. For the purpose of erecting a building, for a school and for religious worship, a tripartite indenture and agreement was made May 14, 1775, between Michael Danner, Sr., then of Hanover on the first part, John Shenck, of Manheim and Jacob Keagy of Heidelberg, ministers, of the Mennonites, John Welty and James Miller, both of Manheim (now Heidelberg), elders of the Mennonite congregation of the second part, and Adam Eichelberger of the third part, concerning the disposition of the land, which was named “Danner’s Repository”, and when granted adjoined lands of Michael Newman, Andrew Shenck and Adam Eichelberger, and contained twelve acres. It was agreed upon by the heads of the congregation, “to hold equally in common, and for the use of said congregation erect a schoolhouse and meetinghouse, and locate a place to bury the dead, and for the use of the German Lutherans and German Reformed Calvinists, who may join in erecting a schoolhouse thereon, and supporting a schoolmaster, and also for a place of burial for their dead.” They then released unto Adam Eichelberger the right of being a trustee for the Lutheran and Reformed congregations and for a school building, but “reserving and retaining for themselves entire use and their successors forever; a house of worship to be erected on some part of said land when said Mennonite congregation may see fit to erect one.”
• Source: History of York county Pennsylvania by John Gibson, 1886.
• Online source: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vstern/bairs/bairs_meeting_house.htm

14. The Palatines:
• The Story of the Palatines: Introduction
This presentation was given at the Annual General Meeting of the UELAC in June, 2006 by Joan Lucas UE to the branch Genealogists’ Workshop.
The presentation was prepared by George Anderson UE and it covered information which he found over the years while researching the Palatines.
What is a Palatine? A Palatine is usually defined as someone who came from along the Rhine River in the Palatinate of South Western Germany. However this term can be a misnomer. Many inhabitants of the Palatinate came from elsewhere. For example, Huguenots (French Protestants) fled from France and Calvinists fled from the Netherlands to the Palatinate. Other families migrated from Switzerland to the area. They all became Palatines. This term was generally applied to all German Immigrants who arrived in America.
What was the Palatinate? The Palatinate consisted of two small regions in southern Germnay near the Rhine River. The Lower or Rhenish Palatinate which was also called the Pfalz was located in southwester German east of Luxembourg along both sides of the Middle Rhine River. The Pfalz included the present German State of Mainz, Treves, Lorraine, Alsace, Baden and Wurtemberg. Heidelberg was its capital. The name Pfalz” was derived from the Latin word “palatinus” which meant palace or castle. The Upper (Bavarian) Palatinate was located in northern Bavaria, on both sides of the Naab River as it flows south toward the Danube, and extended eastward to the Bohemian Forest. The Palatines were ruled by Counts who later became Electors in the 14th century. The boundaries of the Palatinate varied with the military successes and political fortunes of the Counts Palatine. TOday the Palatinate land west of the Rhine River is part of France. The rest of the Palatinate has been absorbed into other German States.
Origin of Palatine Name. The name, Palatine is derived from the title of the ruler of the Palatinate which means the Ruler of the Principality of the Palatine. The term Palatine itself goes back to Imperial Rome. The palace of the Caesars was situated on the Palatine Hill. The troops guarding the palace were also referred to as the “palatini”.
Why did the Palatines leave Germany? Different sources cite different reasons. Here are a few. The Palatinate was the centre of a deadly conflict between the Protestant German states and France during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Between 1684 and 1713 there were two wars, the War of the Grand Alliance of England, Holland and the German Protestant States against France, and the War of the Spanich Succession. The War of the Spanish Succession resulted from the death of Charles II of Spain without an heir. Except for four years of relative peace there was almost continuous war between 1684 and 1713. The troops of the French King Louis XIV ravaged the Palatinate, sacking the major cities, burning homes, stealing property, massacring people, destroying crops and laying waste to farms. An unexpected cold winter then occurred in 1709. The people had had enough and began to leave even though forbidden to do so upon pain of death by the rulers of the Palatinates. The Palatines fled down the Rhine to Rotterdam, Holland and then to England. The British Government circulated the “Golden Book” which was written by Reverend Kockerthal, throughout the Palantinate. It described British America as teh Land of milk and honey.
Final Remarks of the Speaker:
My Thoughts: I have been extremely troubled by the fact that both Mr. and Mrs. Ulrich Tanner died in 1700; a child was born in 1700 with no further notes; & Samuel died in 1697. It seems Michael & Hans Jacob (1771) were the only ones that survived. Could it be that is just how it is? Or did something else happen. I began a research to find out what this Palatine meant–it was noted that Michael Danner was among the German Palatines aboard the John Goodman Ship when they migrated to American in 1727. It seems possible to me that the Tanners were possibly among the massacred people of this area as it is described.

Genealogy:
Michael Danner’s Parents who are my Paternal 7th great grandparents
• Ulrich Danner
My 7th great grandfather
Birth 12 MAY 1667 in Britzingen,MULLHEIM,LOERRACH,BADEN
Death 9 Feb 1700 in Britzingen, Breisqua-Hochschwartzwald, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany

• Chrystina Reitlickerin
My 7th great grandmother
Birth 1674 in Baden, Mannheim, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany
Death 1700 in Baden, Mannheim, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany
Marriage to Ulrich Danner: 1689, Mannheim, Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg, German

• Children:
Samuel Danner (Son) 1691 – 1697
Michael Danner (Son) 1696 – 1782 (My 6th Great Grandfather)
Hans Jacob Danner (Son) 1698 – 1771
Solomon Danner (Son) 1700 – 1700
(If you will notice that none of the below have any sources to prove they are accurate. I am pretty sure the family names before this are correct and accurate, all the rest I am still looking for any proof to show they are correct or are not right. I put them in this to show what genealogy that was given at this time.
Ulrich Danner’s Parents who are my Paternal 8th Great Grandparent’s:
• ULRICH TANNER I
My 8th great grandfather
Birth May 26, 1639 in Walterswil, Bern, Switzerland
Death 9 FEB 1693 in Britzingen, Breisqua-Hochschwartzwald, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany

• Magdalena Birchering
My 8th great grandmother
Birth 1645 in Bern, Bern, Switzerland
Death 4 MAR 1693 in Britzingen, Loerrach, Baden

• Children:
Ulrich Danner (Son) 1667 – 1700 (My 7th Great Grandfather)

ULRICH TANNER I parents who are my Paternal 9th Great Grandparents:

• HANS TANNER
My 9th great grandfather
Birth in Duerrneroth, Bern, Switzerland
Death in Bern, Bern, Switzerland
• Apollonia Leemann
• My 9th great grandmother
• Birth in Switzerland
• Death in Switzerland

• Children:

ULRICH TANNER I (Son) 1639 – 1693 (My 8th Great Grandfather)

HANS TANNER’s Parents who are my 10th Great Grandparents:

• Michael Danner (Tanner)
My 10th great grandfather
Birth in Lützelflüh, Bern, Switzerland
Death in Switzerland

• MARGARETHA MEYER
My 10th great grandmother
Birth 1538 in Lützelflüh, Bern, Switzerland

• Children:
HANS TANNER

Michel Tanner 1572 –

Michael Danner (Tanner) parents who are my 11th Great Grandparents
• Johann Jakob Tanner
My 11th great grandfather
Birth 1509 in Lutzelflueh, Bern, Switzerland
Death 1570 in Klettenberg, Sachsen, Prussia, Germany

• Katharina Arnold
My 11th great grandmother
Birth 1513 in Bern, Switzerland
Death 1570 in Klettenberg, Sachsen, Prussia, Germany

• Children:
Michael Danner (Tanner) (Son) My 10th Great Grandfather
Elsbeth Tanner (Daughter) 1545 – 1587
Sebastian Tanner (Son) 1545 –
Peter Tanner (Son) 1546 –
Johann Jakob Tanner’s parents who are my 12th Great Grandparents
• Sebastian Tanner
My 12th great grandfather
Birth 1489 in Bern, Switzerland
Death in Switzerland

• Barbara Zwyer
• My 12th great grandmother
Birth about 1480 in Schwyz, Switzerland
Death

Jacob Danner My Paternal 5th Great Grandfather


Here is the data and resources I was able to find on Jacob Danner, my dad Donald and Uncle Gerald Danner’s 4th great grandfather.
Jacob Danner
My 5th great grandfather
Birth 1727 in Lancaster Co., PA (now in York Co., PA)
Death 1799 in Brownsville, Frederick, MD, USA

Resources Found:
1. Family Data Collection – Births about Jacob Danner
• Source Information: Edmund West, comp. Family Data Collection – Births [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2001.
• Name: Jacob Danner
Father: Michael Danner
Mother: Anna Bend
• Birth Date: 1727
• County: Lancaster
• State: PA
• Country: USA

2. Family Data Collection – Individual Records about Jacob Danner
• Source Information: Edmund West, comp. Family Data Collection – Births [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2001.
• Name: Jacob Danner
Parents: Michael Danner, Anna Bend
Birth Place: Lancaster Co, PA
Birth Date: 1728
Death Place: Brownsville, MD
Death Date: 1800

3. U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 about Jacob Danner
• Source Citation: Source number: 551.000; Source type: Electronic Database; Number of Pages: 1; Submitter Code: LLH.
• Source Information: Yates Publishing. U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2004.
• Name: Jacob Danner
Gender: Male
Birth Place:PA
Birth Year: 1727
Spouse Name:Elizabeth Bechtol
Marriage Year:1750

4. Web: Maryland, Find A Grave Index, 1637-2012 about Jacob Danner
• Source Information: Ancestry.com. Web: Maryland, Find A Grave Index, 1637-2012 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
Original data: Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi: accessed 4 February 2013.
• Name: Jacob Danner
Birth Date: 1727
Age at Death: 72
Death Date:1799
Burial Place: Brownsville, Washington County, Maryland, USA
URL: http://www.findagrave.com

5. Pennsylvania, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1772-1890 about Jacob Donner
• Source Information: Ancestry.com. Pennsylvania, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1772-1890 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 1999.
Original data: Jackson, Ronald V., Accelerated Indexing Systems, comp.. Pennsylvania Census, 1772-1890. Compiled and digitized by Mr. Jackson and AIS from microfilmed schedules of the U.S. Federal
Decennial Census, territorial/state censuses, and/or census substitutes.
• Name: Jacob Donner
State: PA
County: Philadelphia County
Township: Philadelphia
Year: 1749
Database: PA Early Census Index

6. 1790 United States Federal Census about Jacob Danner
• Source Citation: Year: 1790; Census Place: , Frederick, Maryland; Series: M637; Roll: 3; Page: 157; Image: 463; Family History Library Film: 0568143.
Original data: First Census of the United States, 1790 (NARA microfilm publication M637, 12 rolls) Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29 National Archives, Washington, D.C.
• Name: Jacob Danner
Home in 1790 (City, County, and State): Frederick, Maryland
Free White Persons – Males – 16 and over: 4
Free White Persons – Females: 2
Number of Household Members: 6

7. Family Data Collection – Deaths about Jacob Danner
• Source Information: Edmund West, comp.. Family Data Collection – Deaths [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc., 2001.
• Name: Jacob Danner
Death Date: 1799
City: Brownsville
County: Frederick
State: MD
Country: USA

This is where Jacob Danner is buried

This is where Jacob Danner is buried

8. Find A Grave Memorial# 31820712
• Danner, Jacob 1727-1799
Birth: 1727
Death: 1799
Burial: Old Brownsville Church of the Brethren Cemetery
Brownsville, Washington County, Maryland, USA
Created by: Leanne Keefer Bechdel
Record added: Nov 29, 2008
He was the son of Michael and Anna Bend Danner of Hanover Pennsylvania. His parents are buried at Bair’s Meeting House cemetery. He was married to Elizabeth Bechtel a daughter of Samuel and Magdelena Bechtel.
A brother in Colonial America by Donald Durnbaugh cites a letter from a Nicholas Martin to Alexander Mack, Jr. dated 24 May 1772 at Conocacheague.
Martin was a minister of the early Conococheague congregation who had previously been an elder of the Little Conewago church. Letter has the following ” As far as the brethren are concerned who were to be ordained, they did not come, nor did Brother Daniel Letterman and Brother Jacob Donner (Danner). This clearly shows Jacob was Brethren. Letter goes on to say ” there was much opposition against Brother Donner so that he could not be ordained with unanimity of the congregation.
Became presiding Elder and Founder of the Codorus Church of the Brethren in *1758 in “Dunker Valley” between Loganville and Dallastown. *Purchased 840 acres of land in Woodboro, Maryland on 26 June 1762 and moved *there. Became elder of Beaver Dam Church of the Brethren, Frederick Co., MD. *Gleim reports he was Minister of Little Conewago Church. Last noted attended *Annual Church Conference during 1799 along with his brother, Henry.
Jacob and Elizabeth Bechdel Danner had the follow children:
Mary Danner 1751 – 1753
Henry Danner 1751 –
George Danner 1752 – 1844
Samuel Danner 1752 – 1790
Michael Danner 1754 – 1759
Jacob Danner 1756 – 1795
Catherine Danner 1759 – 1759
Frederick Danner 1759 – 1839 ( My 4th Great Grandfather)
David Danner 1766 – 1786

9. Old Brownsville Church of the Brethren Cemetery, Brownsville, Washington Co., Md.
Cemetery notes and/or description: Burials started here in the mid-1800s and continue to the present. It was previously the site of the church, which has been torn down and a monument erected in its place, giving some history. Brownsville Church of the Brethren built a new church on Rohrersville Road. Brownsville Heights Cemetery, dating to the 1950s, is at that location. Questions about this cemetery should be directed to the Brownsville Church of the Brethren, 1911 Rohrersville Road, Brownsville, MD 21715. Phone #’s are 301-834-8538 and 301-432-8354.

Old Brownsville Church of the Brethren Cemetery, Brownsville, Washington Co., Md

Helpful Web-Site to Help with Genealogy Search


I am always looking for new free websites to aid me in my search for my family history.
I find by reading others blogs and learning from what they have done in their family research I open new ways to find more about my family history.
Below are a few of the website I have found from others that have helped me, so hope might be able to help you too.
I would love everyone who reads this to share any free website you use that I can add to my list to use.
This is a process that for me will always be a “Work in Progress” and “Learning on the Job” experience.
No matter how long I have been at this Genealogy I find I can and need to learn new ways to approach and use the resources that come available in aiding and fine tuning my family history and make it as correct and accurate as I possible can.

Helpful Web-Site to Help with Genealogy Search:
https://new.familysearch.org/en/action/treeview

http://www.theancestorhunt.com/newspapers.html

http://indexingforfamilysearch.wordpress.com/2014/05/04/english-active-public-projects-percentages-update-for-may-4-2014/

http://www.werelate.org/wiki/Main_Page

http://www.genealogytoday.com/

http://www.arkansasresearch.com/guideindex.htm

http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/

http://www.progenealogists.com/resources.htm

http://www.genuki.org.uk/gs/

http://genealogy.about.com/od/make_family_tree/u/learn.htm

http://www.worldgenweb.org/upgrade/

http://www.usgenweb.org/

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/default.htm

http://www.archives.gov/research/genealogy/index.html

http://www.genealogytoday.com/

http://www.familytreesearcher.com/

http://www.olivetreegenealogy.com/beginner/

• Finding Our Cousins: Learn how Puzzilla.org can open new branches for growing your family tree.The Puzzilla.org Descendants Viewer lets you see hundreds of descendants from an aerial view.

Good Luck in Your Genealogy search for your family history!

What old and new family traditions do you have?


Grandson's Playing Wii Golf

I had the pleasure of having two of my grandsons over for a sleepover this last Sunday night and then I watched them on Monday while their parents were at work. I forgot how much energy two young boys have, but what a joy it was to spend this time with them. To be able to see the world through the eyes of my grandchildren is a rare blessing that I am so thankful to get to do from time to time with all of my grandchildren.
To open the door on Sunday afternoon to two over joyed boys that thought they had won the lottery to be able to get to do a sleepover at grandpa and grandma’s house. To being greeted with great big bear hugs and kisses warmed my heart. Then they both started talking at the same time, a million miles a minute at all the things they had planned to do in the next 24 hours. Of course there was the bubble bath in the over-sized jetted tub, with the over-sized rubber duck toys that grandma has been collecting since my children were little. There was the playing with the large Tonka Trucks and bike riding, and feeding the horses, and watching Netflix movies with popcorn and hot chocolate for breakfast, and working out in the garden helping to weed ( a chore for us adults but a fun game to see who can get the most weeds for the grandchildren) and playing Wii baseball and golfing, and board games, and logos, and a picnic lunch out on the deck overlooking the valley and their list went on and on, until I reminded them there is only so much this old grandma and grandpa can do in a 24 hour period, and let’s not forget we need to squeeze in a few hours of sleep. Needless to say they manage to fill as much as they could fit into the time they were here, so much so they both fell asleep on the drive to take them back home to their parents.
This made me stop to think about the things I looked forward to when I went to visit my grandparents as a child. My father’s job with the Marine Corp kept us living far away from our extended family so the visits in the summer were our rare chance to enjoy time with our grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins. My maternal grandparents lived in Southern California not far from Disneyland and the beaches. My paternal grandparents lived in a small southern Idaho valley town that has had six generations of our family living there since the late 1800’s. So while we looked forward to visiting both set of grandparents, the experiences we had at each place was very different and yet left cherished memories for me to look back at in my now Golden Years.
At my paternal grandparents the Danner’s, my father has one brother, with four children and there was six siblings in my family, so between all us cousins we had lots of fun. We would go camping and fishing up at Lake Cleveland. We would ride around the surrounding areas while we were told stories about our family and what they did to settle this area. There was always at least one night that all the cousins would put on a variety show for our grandparents, and parents. We would sing and show off our musical abilities and some silly made up skits. We did whatever our imagination would allow us to do.
At my maternal grandparents, my mother has one sister and two brothers who each had lots of cousins for us to play with. Grandma Smith made the best homemade bread and scones and I am pretty sure she would time it that her bread was in the oven baking when we arrived to the sweet aroma of her bread to welcome us for our visit. I remember being a child of the 1960’s thinking my grandparents had to be rich because they were the only ones I knew who could afford a “Color” TV, all the rest of us had 19” black and white TV sets to watch. I thought it was so lucky that our summer vacation in 1969 happened to be timed when we were at our Smith grandparents to watch Mans first Moon walk on their color TV, and to make it even that more memorable for me was grandma’s homemade milkshakes. Life was so good anytime we were at our grandparents. We always had big family picnics to the park with a family baseball games. The fun and trouble us cousins always managed to get ourselves into was priceless and are the stories we enjoy retelling every time we can get together.
My childhood seems like it was only a few years back, and yet here I am 50 plus years later and I am the grandma looking forward to any grandchild visit, and hopefully making some childhood memories they will cherish as much as I cherish my childhood memories. Some family traditions I try to carry on, and creating new traditions too. Some traditions are planned and some just happen in the moment. One new one might have happened on my grandson’s sleepover. My mother in law had this cute “World’s Greatest Grandma” statue that was given to her by one of her grandchildren, which ended up at our home after her death. I had it on a bookshelf in our home office by the 8×10 photos of my husband and my mothers and our grandmothers. Ezrick, my six year old grandson found it cute, and kept moving it to different places, like my bathroom counter-top, on the stove, or other places that he knew I would be going and would see it. It became a game of “Where is the Grandma” that he and I started to play. Then when it was time for them to go home I had them clean up and put the Grandma statue back where she originally had been, by the grandmas’ photos. Yet, when I came home and got on my computer there sitting on my desk lamp looking at me was that Grandma that my grandson had left me.

World's Greatest Grandma

World’s Greatest Grandma

Yes, it’s a simple gesture, but one that melts this grandma’s heart with joy and love. Traditions do not have to be big ones just ones that take us to that place where we say “Thank you God for allowing me to be part of this family.”

My question for this week …. What old and new family traditions do you have?

A Follow-Up About : My Brother Fred and the Family Line Back to Adam


My brother, Fred, was, and to me, will always be, the most amazing person. He would stay on task and followed through with every project he ever did. His genealogy efforts were years of him gathering and recording his research, some the old fashion way, going to places and looking up records at libraries, churches, or other public record buildings. He wrote anyone in the family that might have any leads. He was a great organizer, along with so many other talents he developed though out his life. He also was computer savvy and he followed any leads he could on his research. It helped that his job took him over to England, where that branch of the family had lived. He lived there for the last 25 years of his life, and so he would take weekends, or holiday trips to do some of his research. He had gotten back into some royal family lines, as far back as BC 900.

When I got back home from bringing his stuff back from England in 2011, and put in his family data into two of the genealogy sites that I use: familysearch.org (free site) and ancestry.com (a site that cost, but I use the money my father gives me for Christmas to pay for this site) the other family data started to be found. I have found by working several genealogy sites at the same time, I might find one piece of information on one site, and when I put that information into the other sites, could find more information.

So how was our family able to trace one of our lines all the way back to “Adam“:

• For our family, it was some luck that Fred was able to tie us into several royal lines whose family history is a matter of easy access through public records.
• Some of it was not giving up when hitting blocks, and following every lead.
• What started with our Grandma Ellen Barrett Danner in 1925, starting to record her family history, who then passed it on to her two sons and ten grandchildren, than us, working as a group to get each other whatever information we found so we all could keep adding on to the family line, to getting this family line back to “Adam” in the Fall of 2013, it was a group effort that took 88 years to complete.
• With genealogy becoming as popular as it has become, and the fast pace that information is now being recorded on the computer it most likely won’t take other families as long as it did my family to complete different lines on their family’s histories.
• Also, know that some lines like this one, we got lucky, where others family lines, like our Danner line who happen to come from Switzerland during the period of time that much of the records have been destroyed in the many wars that have taken place in that part of the world throughout history, so we might not get back any further than the 1400 that we are at now.
• We can only go as far as recorded documents will allow us.
• I have come to feel any and every bit of family information I can find and learn from is a great source of joy and gives me a sense of family unity; to my past, present and future.
• For me places like this Blog, is a wonderful source to talk, share, learn, and enjoy the many ways we each go about finding out more about our family’s history.
• Take what you have, stay with doing the research, follow all leads, and don’t give up, or get discourage. You never know where or when you might find another break though in your family history.

You Never Know What Family Information will show up in the less liken places …


In doing my paternal family line of the “Danner” family I got back to my 6th great-grandfather, Michael Danner (1696 – 1782) and hit a block. In doing some research I notice that his name came up as Michael Danner, with his brother Jacob Danner; but every so often I found some legal documents when their names were Michael and Han Tanner. It was noted that Michael Danner was among the German Palatines aboard the John Goodman Ship when they migrated to American in 1727.

So,I did a Google search of “German Palatines” so I could better understand what they were and how it related to my “Danner” family. I found a load of information on that time period and what hardships my ancestors must have endured. It was during this research I discovered that Michael was the son of Ulrich Danner/Tanner and Chrystina Reitlickerin and their families were forced from their home land of Switzerland in all the wars and hardships that were in that part of the world at that time.

Then I read the below article that the end of shocked and delighted me…
“The Story of the Palatines:
Introduction
This presentation was given at the Annual General Meeting of the UELAC in June, 2006 by Joan Lucas UE to the branch Genealogists’ Workshop. The presentation was prepared by George Anderson UE and it covered information which he found over the years while researching the Palatines.
What is a Palatine? A Palatine is usually defined as someone who came from along the Rhine River in the Palatinate of South Western Germany. However this term can be a misnomer. Many inhabitants of the Palatinate came from elsewhere. For example, Huguenots (French Protestants) fled from France and Calvinists fled from the Netherlands to the Palatinate. Other families migrated from Switzerland to the area. They all became Palatines. This term was generally applied to all German Immigrants who arrived in America.
What was the Palatinate? The Palatinate consisted of two small regions in southern Germnay near the Rhine River. The Lower or Rhenish Palatinate which was also called the Pfalz was located in southwester German east of Luxembourg along both sides of the Middle Rhine River. The Pfalz included the present German State of Mainz, Treves, Lorraine, Alsace, Baden and Wurtemberg. Heidelberg was its capital. The name Pfalz” was derived from the Latin word “palatinus” which meant palace or castle. The Upper (Bavarian) Palatinate was located in northern Bavaria, on both sides of the Naab River as it flows south toward the Danube, and extended eastward to the Bohemian Forest. The Palatines were ruled by COunts who later became Electors in the 14th century. The boundaries of the Palatinate varied with the military successes and political fortunes of the Counts Palatine. TOday the Palatinate land west of the Rhine River is part of France. The rest of the Palatinate has been absorbed into other German States.
Origin of Palatine Name. The name, Palatine is derived from the title of the ruler of the Palatinate which means the Ruler of the Principality of the Palatine. The term Palatine itself goes back to Imperial Rome. The palace of the Caesars was situated on the Palatine Hill. The troops guarding the palace were also referred to as the “palatini”.
Why did the Palatines leave Germany? Different sources cite different reasons. Here are a few. The Palatinate was the centre of a deadly conflict between the Protestant German states and France during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Between 1684 and 1713 there were two wars, the War of the Grand Alliance of England, Holland and the German Protestant States against France, and the War of the Spanich Succession. The War of the Spanish Succession resulted from the death of Charles II of Spain without an heir. Except for four years of relative peace there was almost continuous war between 1684 and 1713. The troops of the French King Louis XIV ravaged the Palatinate, sacking the major cities, burning homes, stealing property, massacring people, destroying crops and laying waste to farms. An unexpected cold winter then occurred in 1709. The people had enough and began to leave even though forbidden to do so upon pain of death by the rulers of the Palatinates. The Palatines fled down the Rhine to Rotterdam, Holland and then to England. The British Government circulated the “Golden Book” which was written by Reverend Kockerthal, throughout the Palantinate. It described British America as the Land of milk and honey.

The Professors Final Thoughts:

I have been extremely troubled by the fact that both Mr. and Mrs. Ulrich Tanner died in 1700; a child was born in 1700 with no further notes; & their other son, Samuel died in 1697.
It seems Michael (1696 – 1782) & his brother Hans Jacob (1698- 1771)Tanner/Danner were the only ones that survived.
Could it be that is just how it is? Or did something else happen.
I began a research to find out what this Palatine meant–it was noted that Michael Danner was among the German Palatines aboard the John Goodman Ship when they migrated to American in 1727. It seems possible to me that the Tanner family members were possibly among the massacred people of this area as it is described.”

…. Could it be true this professor was talking about my 7tth and 6th paternal great grandfathers? As I plugged in the information from this article into my geology family tree as “Tanner” it took me back another seven generations and here is what this one article helped me find

Sebastian Tanner (1489 – ) is my 13th great-grandfather

Johann Jakob Tanner (1510 – 1571) is my 12th great-grandfather son of Sebastian Tanner

MICHAEL TANNER (1536 – ) is my 11th great-grandfather son of Johann Jakob Tanner

Hans Tanner (1566 – ) is my 10th great-grandfather son of MICHAEL TANNER

Ulrich Jakob Tanner (1600 – ) is my 9th great-grandfather son of Hans Tanner

Ulrich Peter Tanner/Danner (1638 – 1693) is my 8th great-grandfather son of Ulrich Jakob Tanner

Ulrich Tanner/Danner (1667 – 1700) is my 7th great-grandfather son of Ulrich Peter Tanner/Danner

Michael Danner (1696 – 1782) is my 6th great-grandfather son of Ulrich Tanner/Danner

The problem I have now is in the mist of doing the research on another geology site I use I found the following conflicting information …

Bernhart Danner (1570 – ) is my 10th great-grandfather

Peter Danner (1601 – ) son of Bernhart Danner, and is 9th great-grandfather)

ULRICH TANNER I (1639 – 1693) son of Peter Danner, and is my 8th great-grandfather)

Ulrich Danner (1667 – 1700) son of ULRICH TANNER I, and is my 7th great-grandfather

Michael Danner (1696 – 1782) son of Ulrich Danner, and is my 6th great-grandfather

Both of the geology sites I am using have different names and dates, but neither have any documents to prove or disprove which one is correct and which one is not. That time period in that area has little records that survived the many wars that have accrued there.

So my geologist blogging friends, here is my question for the week.

When you find conflicting data, with neither being able to verify with records, how do you go about finding the proof you need; or knowing which one to follow?

I try to keep an open mind, and follow all leads as I find them to see where they might take me. But, why is it when I open one door in my “Family” search I end up with more questions than the one I was attempting to solve?